The National War Memorial – Lest We Forget

Beth Walsh photography

This is the National War Memorial in Ottawa, which honours more than 116,000 Canadians who died in the Great War of 1914-1918. We had visited the monument a couple of weeks before Cpl. Nathan Cirillo, a reservist with the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders, was gunned down while standing guard in front of the monument. The honour guard has served as sentries at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier during the summer since 2007. The ceremonial guard was reinstated two days after the attack and will continue to serve until Nov. 10, the day before Remembrance Day.

The remains of an unidentified Canadian soldier who died in the First World War were repatriated from France in May 2000 and, in a special ceremony, buried in a special tomb in front of the war memorial.

© Copyright Beth Walsh Photography. All rights reserved.

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Tales from the Diner

Ice Cream for Dinner

I have a secret. I have kept it for years. It is the kind of secret that you don’t dare tell, if not for fear of the possible consequences, for fear that no one will listen. Both outcomes are unwelcome and damaging in their own right.

My friends and I have shared this secret and all its grisly details over eager sips of coffee after long overnight shifts, our voices heightened in our rage and our exhaustion. I had hurriedly whispered conversations with my coworkers during hasty smoke breaks and bathroom trips. These were girls with whom I had nothing in common – save our employment and our secret. Sometimes we exploded. Sometimes we wept.

It is not that I am weary from this business of silence; I have not broken. But I realize now that I have no reason to let my anger lie dormant. The injustice has become unpalatable.

For…

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One-Star Amazon Reviews of Pulitzer Winners

The Junto

Portrait Of Joseph PulitzerWe talk a lot about accessibility in historical writing. Many of us worry whether the academic historical profession has much to say to a broad popular audience. It’s a pretty old form of anxiety. But what do the general public in the United States really want from their history books?

A few days ago, I decided to try an experiment. I collected all the one-star customer reviews at Amazon.com for the last twenty years of Pulitzer Prize winners in history. (No award was given in 1994, so I included books from 1995 to 2014.) I wanted to see whether I could identify common complaints. Obviously, this wouldn’t be a very scientific experiment, but at least it would be reasonably systematic—slightly better, perhaps, than relying on anecdotes from acquaintances.

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Life in a Haunted House

Cold

haunted house kids trick or treatWe never get any trick-or-treaters. I can tell myself that it’s because we’re the only house on a dead-end street and surely, being off the beaten path is part of the problem. But if I’m to be completely honest, it’s because I know that little kids are afraid of our home.

Yes, we live in THAT house.

It’s the one we all dared each other to visit on Halloween. The one that got the occasional egging from only the bravest, most rebellious teens. The one that made toddlers cry.

In the neighborhood I grew up in outside of Chicago, there was a dark, recessed house that looked like a Turkish prison. It definitely stuck out, as the rest of the homes in our neighborhood had been built in the early 1960s and had a decidedly family-friendly feel to them. Swing sets in the back yard, goofy Halloween decorations and middle…

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